J.ophthalmol.(Ukraine).2021;5:71-76.

http://doi.org/10.31288/oftalmolzh202157176

Received: 12 April 2021; Published on-line: 23 October 2021


Bilateral morning glory syndrome associated with persistent fetal vasculature syndrome and corpus callosum agenesis: a case report

N. F. Bobrova, T. V. Romanova, A. V. Shilik

SI "The Filatov Institute of Eye Diseases and Tissue Therapy of the NAMS of Ukraine"; Odesa (Ukraine)

E-mail: filatov.detskoe7@gmail.com

TO CITE THIS ARTICLE: Bobrova NF, Romanova TV, Shilik AV. Bilateral morning glory syndrome associated with persistent fetal vasculature syndrome and corpus callosum agenesis: a case report. J.ophthalmol.(Ukraine).2021;5:71-6.  http://doi.org/10.31288/oftalmolzh202157176

 

Background: The morning glory (MG) syndrome is a rare, sporadic and commonly unilateral anomaly. The MG and persistent fetal vasculature (PVF) syndromes are generally considered as isolated ocular manifestations of failures in various stages of embryogenesis of the eye. 

Purpose: To describe the clinical manifestations of a bilateral combined ocular pathology, the MG syndrome and PVF syndrome, associated with congenital central nervous system (CNS) and bone anomalies.

Material and Methods: We described a rare variant of binocular manifestation of the MG syndrome associated both with the PVF syndrome and CNS involvement in a 7-month infant. 

Results: In the pediatric case reported here, the bilateral combination of MG syndrome and PVF syndrome is accompanied by congenital CNS anomalies, corpus callosum agenesis and vicarious ventriculomegaly. To the best of our knowledge, this congenital association has been not reported previously, which made us to report this case.

Conclusion: Morning glory syndrome is a rare congenital disorder whose pathogenesis is still not fully understood. The rare infant case reported here demonstrates an association of the MG syndrome with another congenital anomaly of the eye (the persistent fetal vasculature syndrome) and a major congenital anomaly of the CNS, corpus callosum agenesis, which requires not only detailed and comprehensive medical evaluation, but also longitudinal patient surveillance in cooperation with allied specialties like neuropathology, pediatrics, etc.

Keywords: morning glory syndrome, persistent fetal vasculature syndrome, congenital CNS and bone anomalies

 

References

1. Bobrova NF, Vit VV. [Atlas of congenital and hereditary disease of the eye]. Odessa: Palmira; 2006. p.68-9. Russian.

2. Tyszka JM, Kennedy DP, Adolphs E, Paul LK. Intact Bilateral Resting-State Networks in the Absence of the Corpus Callosum. J Neurosci. 2011 Oct 19; 31(42): 15154–162. 

Crossref  PubMed

3. Brown GC, Tasmand WS. Congenital Anomalies of the Optic Disc. New York, NY: Grune & Stratton;1983. p. 123-70. 

4. Ellika S, Robson CD, Heidary G, Paldino MG. Morning glory disc anomaly: characteristic MR imaging findings. Am J Neuroradiol. 2013 Oct;34(10):2010-4. 

Crossref  PubMed

5. Strominger MB. Morning Glory Syndrome. Neuro-Ophthalmology. 2015 Oct 14. 

6. Bobrova NF, Skripnichenko ZM. [Toxic, congenital, and secondary cataracts]. Odessa: Feniks; 2017. Russian.

7. Birnholz JC, Farrell EE. Fetal hyaloid artery: timing of regression with US. Radiology. 1988 Mar;166(3):781-3. 

Crossref  PubMed

8. Goldberg MF. Persistent fetal vasculature (PFV): an integrated interpretation of signs and symptoms associated with persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV). Am J Ophthalmol. 1997 Nov;124(5):587-626. 

Crossref

9. Reis W. Eine wenig bekannte typische Missbildung am Sehenrveheintritt: Unschriebene Grubenbildung auf der Papilla n. optici. Z Augenheilkd. 1908;19:505–28.  

Crossref

10. Handmann M. Erbliche vermutlich angeborene zentrale gliose Entartung des Sehnerven mit besonderer Beteilingung der Zentralgefaesse. Klin Monatsbl Augenheilkd. 1929;83:145-52. 

11. Kindler P. Morning glory syndrome: unusual congenital optic disk anomaly. Am J Ophthalmol. 1970 Mar;69(3):376-84. 

Crossref

12. Miller NR, Newman NJ, eds. Anomalies of the optic disc. In: The essentials: Walsh & Hoyt's Clinical Neuroophthalmology. 5th ed. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins. p.117-23.

13. Safari A, Jafari E, Borhani-Haghighi A. Morning glory syndrome associated with multiple sclerosis. Iran J Neurol. 2014 Jul 4;13(3):177-80.

14. Steinkuller PG. The morning glory disk anomaly: Case report and literature review. J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. Mar-Apr 1980;17(2):81-7. 

Crossref

15. Traboulsi EL, Jurdi-Nuwayhid F, Torbey NS, et al. Aniridia, atypical iris defects, optic pit and the morning glory disc anomaly in a family. Ophthalmic Paediatr Genet. 1986 Aug;7(2):131-5. 

Crossref  PubMed

16. Dempster AG, Lee WR, Forrester JV, McCreath GT. The 'morning glory syndrome' - a mesodermal defect? Ophthalmologica. 1983;187:222-30. 

Crossref  PubMed

17. Pollock S. The morning glory disc anomaly: contractile movement, classification, and embryogenesis. Doc Ophthalmol. 1987 Apr;65(4):439-60. 

Crossref  PubMed 

18. Collins ET. Developmental deformities of the crystalline lens. Ophthalmoscope. 1908; 6:577–83, 663. 

19. Khvatova AV, Sudovskaia TV. [Clinical features, diagnostic and treatment options for unilateral congenital cataracts associated with persistent primary vitreous syndrome: a textbook for physicians]. Moscow; 2002. Russian. 

20. Antely I, Cohen E, Karshai E, BenEzra D. Unilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous: course and outcome. J AAPOS. 2002 Apr;6(2):92-9. Crossref  PubMed

21. Kanigowska K, Grałek M, Chipczyńiska B, Hautz W. [Problems in surgical management of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous in children]. Klin Oczna. 2006;108(1-3):51-4. Polish. 

22. Roche O, Sylla FK, Beby F, et al. [Persistence and hyperplasia of primary vitreous]. J Fr Ophtalmol. 2007 Jun;30(6):647-57. 

Crossref

23. Azuma N, Yamaguchi Y et.al. Mutations of the PAX6 gene detected in patients with a variety of optic-nerve malformations. Am J Hum Genet. 2003 Jun;72(6):1565–70. 

Crossref  PubMed

24. Krasnovid TA, Grubnik NP. [Morning glory syndrome associated with persistent hyaloid artery]. Oftalmol Zh. 2011;6:53-5. Russian. 

Crossref

25. Matsubara A, Ozeki H, Matsunaga N, et al. Histopathological examination of two cases of anterior staphyloma associated with Peters’ anomaly and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Br J Ophthalmol. 2001 Dec;85(12):1421–5. 

Crossref  PubMed

26. Cenamo G, Liguori G, Pezone A, Laccarino G. Morning glory syndrome associated with marked persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous and lens colobomas. Br J Ophthalmol. 1989 Aug;73(8):684–6. 

Crossref  PubMed

27. Fei P, Zhang Q, Li J, Zhao P. Clinical characteristics and treatment of 22 eyes of morning glory syndrome associated with persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Br J Ophthalmol. 2013 Oct;97(10):1262–7. 

Crossref  PubMed

28. Xu LT, Grigorian AP. Morning Glory anomaly. Neuro-Ophthalmology. 2020;5. 

29. Loddenkemper T, Friedman NR, Ruggieri PM, et al. Pituitary stalk duplication in association with moya moya disease and bilateral morning glory disc anomaly. J Neurol. 2008 Jun;255(6):885-90. 

Crossref  PubMed

30. Quah BL, Hamilton J, Blaser S, et al. Morning glory disc anomaly, midline cranial defects and abnormal carotid circulation: an association worth looking for. Pediatr Radiol. 2005 May; 35(5):525-8. 

Crossref  PubMed

31. Ponnatapura J. Morning glory syndrome with Moyamoya disease: A rare association with role of imaging. Indian J Radiol Imaging. Apr-Jun 2018;28(2):165-8. 

Crossref  PubMed

32. Komiyama M, Yasui T, Sakamoto H, et al. Basal meningoencephalocele, anomaly of optic disc and panhypopituitarism in association with moyamoya disease. Pediatr Neurosurg. 2000 Aug;33(2):100-4. 

Crossref  PubMed

33. Lee BJ, Traboulsi EI. Update on the morning glory disc anomaly. Ophthalmic Genet. 2008 Jun;29(2):47-52. 

Crossref  PubMed

34. Brodsky MC. Pediatric Neuro-Ophthalmology. 2nd ed. New York: Springer; 2010. 

Crossref